You’re constructing a home or business, and now you’re forced to deal with the unfortunate experience that proceeds the hiring of an incompetent contractor. Their lack of professionalism and standard leads to property defects and leads you to contemplate litigation.

Facing the result of a poorly done job is time-consuming and stressful. A homeowner, business owner, or property owner shouldn’t have to manage these kinds of issues. Nonetheless, “fly by night,” contractors are all over the place, trying to score quick and easy cash. Jobs can be done quickly and meet a professional standard, but that not the case with some contractors.

To avoid this aggravating situation, vet your contractor by ensuring they meet the standards below.

Provides all requested information

This information could include a written estimate detailing the agreed-upon work, a portfolio highlighting their previous work, licenses, and the required permits and inspections to ensure the project is up to building code.

Doesn’t require a full payment upfront

Though a professional contractor knows his work will meet the standard necessary for payment, asking for a percentage of payment upfront is common in the construction industry. This payment provides the contractor peace of mind that even if something goes awry with the payment source, they received some of the payment for the work they completed.

If the contractor asks for full payment before beginning the work, that’s a red flag.

They are trustworthy

A good contractor holds up agreements and meets contractual obligations. They will only use the agreed-upon materials, and if the materials aren’t available, the contractor will contact you to suggest a product equal in value before beginning the project.

Abides by property rules

As a homeowner or business owner, there are specific rules you may want the contractor to follow. A reliable one will do so. They will clean up adequately, respect particular spaces, and follow any other requests you make.

They communicate effectively

Throughout each stage of the constructing process, you and your contractor should be in contact to ensure the project is meeting expectations. If you don’t hear from your contractor for an extensive period, begin to investigate to make sure the contractor isn’t trying to complete shoddy work under your nose.

Finally, understand that there are individuals in all industries that put on a great show, but fail to produce a worthwhile final product.